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It's My 3rd Repeat C-Section! I Want My Tubes Tied, But Dr. Wants Tubes Taken Out Instead. What Should I Do?

April 12, 2018

Tie your tubes or have them removed?

 

If you are absolutely sure you don’t want to have any more babies in the future, permanent sterilization may be a good option for you.

 

Methods that are considered permanent include tubal ligation, removal of both fallopian tubes (bilateral salpingectomy), Essure (putting coils in the fallopian tubes by putting a camera in the uterus) and for the male, vasectomy. If you are already having a repeat cesarean section it makes sense to do either a tubal ligation or removal of both tubes.

 

We are much more in favor of removing both fallopian tubes these days for a couple of very important reasons. Over the last few years it has been identified that many cases of ovarian cancer actually begin at the distal end of the fallopian tube. By completely removing the fallopian tubes, your risk of getting ovarian cancer is markedly reduced for the future. This will be an additional benefit to you over that of just birth control. 

 

Second, tubal ligation is not perfect and there is a 1/300 to 1/3000 chance of still getting pregnant with a tubal ligation. Many of these pregnancies can be ectopic and develop in the fallopian tube which can be require surgery or even be life threatening.  Removing the fallopian tubes eliminates the chance of pregnancy. 

 

Some patients with tubal ligations can get post tubal ligation syndrome where menstrual blood gets trapped in the proximal end of the fallopian tube each month and causes cyclic pain. This would not happen with removal of the tubes.  So overall it is a much better choice to remove both tubes as opposed to tying them, and it doesn't really take more time and the recovery is no different.

 

There are times where tubal ligation or removal of both fallopian tubes is not technically feasible due to scar tissue or other reasons, so even if you sign up for this it will be at the discretion of your doctor if it is truly feasible. In the rare case where tubal ligation or removal of the tubes can not be technically accomplished, other methods of birth control can be discussed after delivery.

 

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HAVE QUESTIONS ABOUT YOUR PREGNANCY?

 

Schedule an in-office appointment to chat with us. We'd love to meet you! Call us at 516-365-6100 to set up a convenient appointment. We're located right off the Northern State Parkway here in North Hills, Long Island, just a few minutes away from North Shore University Hospital & Northwell Health.

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